STRIPERSPACE.COM LOGO


Striped Bass Fishing Lures


This section provides information about lures for striped bass fishing.



There are many excellent lures for catching striped bass. Some of our favorites are shown below.


Swiming Lures


My favorite swimming lures are Bombers,
1 and 2, on the right. I have caught more stripers on Bombers than any other lure I've ever used.

I've also used Mega Bait lures, 3 and 4, on the right. They are slightly heavier and you can cast them farther. Also they have a neat built in rattle. Unfortunately they don't seem to be available anymore.

Other good swimming lures include:
Guides Choice, and Diawa SP Minnow.

For swimming lures, use yellow in the day and black at night. I usually use teasers with both.

Swimming lures should be retrieved at a speed, usually slow, that allows their lips to impart a swimming motion on the lure. This results in a slight pulsation of the rod tip that you can both see and feel.

To see more about swimming lures, follow this Link: Swimming Lures



Large Swimming Lures


Sometimes you need to cast a little farther, and you need a heavier plug. Three good heavier weight swimming plugs are shown on the right.

Top: SPRO Prime Minnow, 1¾ oz.
Middle: Rebel Wind Cheater, 2 oz.
Bottom: Danny, 2¼ oz.

To see another good large swimming lure, follow this Link: Bunka Boy

To see more about large swimming lures follow this Link: Large Swimming Lures



Poppers


When the fish are on top, as evidenced by bird activity or other commotion, it may be time for a popper. There are many good ones, including those shown on the right.

Top: Stillwater Smack-It.
Middle: Knuckle-Head.
Bottom: Gibbs Pencil Popper.

Poppers should be retrieved in short bursts that make the lure pop and creates a commotion.

Link to more about: Popper Fishing Lures



Needlefish Lures


Needlefish are long , slim lures that imitate narrow baitfish and sand eels. Their aerodynamic shape enables long casts.

Top: Gibbs Needlefish
Bottom:Super Strike Needlefish

Needlefish are usually retrieved slow and steady. They are used mostly at night.

Link to more about: Needlefish Lures



Metal Lures


Often metal lures get good results. Three of the best are shown on the right.

The top one is a Kastmaster and in the middle is a Hopkins. An AVA Diamond Jig is on the bottom.

You can fish them plain, add hair
or a colored tube tail, green being a good choice.

Often bluefish hit these lures, so I replace the treble hooks with single hooks to make it easier to unhook those toothy critters.

To keep a metal lure near the surface, retrieve it rapidly.
To get it deep, pause and let it sink deeper before retrieving. Retrieve it fast to catch bluefish; slower for stripers.

Use the Ava's when casting from the surf when sand eels are the prevalent bait.

For jigging from a boat use a heavier AVA Diamond Jig, maybe an A-47 or A67, to get the jig down near the bottom.

Link to more about: Metal Lures



Soft Plastic Lures


Some of the best striped bass lures are made of soft plastic. Three excellent examples are shown on the right.

Top: Slug-Go
Middle: Pencil Worm
Bottom: Fin-S Fish

Fish them on a worm hook, or on a jighead to get
them deeper into the water column.

Link to more about: Soft Plastic Lures



Scented Soft Plastic Lures


Berkly Gulp Sand Eels and Swimming Mullett

Berkley Gulp Jerk Shad
and Swimming Mullet


Some soft plastic lures come impregnated with a fish attracting scent, Berkley Gulp being a good example.

You can also make a soft plastic lure scented by squirting a scent on it, soaking the lure in a fish attracting scent, or rubbing a fish attracting scent on the lure.

To find out more about scented soft plastic
lures follow this link: Scented Soft Plastic Lures



Swim Shads


Swim Shads include the Storm WildEye series shown on the right. These feature a molded in jighead with a salt impregnated tough soft plastic body and a holographic foil insert.

These really work, as they look exactly like the baitfish they are designed to imitate.Tsunami also makes similar lures that work great.

A slow retrieve with not much manipulation usually works well with these lures.

Link to more about: Swim Shads



Bucktails


Bucktails have been around for years, and stripers still go for them.

I sometimes replace the bucktail with feathers, but this is unnecessary. Adding curlytails or porkrind trailers is a popular addition. A picture of a bucktail with a porkrind trailer is provide by this link.

.

Bucktails work best when allowed to sink lower in the water column before starting the retrieve. On the retrieve bump the bucktail up on about every third crank of the reel handle. The hits come as the bucktail falters.

Link to more about: Bucktails



Teasers


I often use a teaser on a dropper loop ahead of the lure. These can be simple streamer flies tied with bucktail as shown by the middle three on the right. Any color is OK, as long as it's yellow.

Sometimes I will use a Deceiver fly (top) as a teaser, if I have some extras, or beat up ones.

The teaser on the bottom is a "Red Gill"; somewhat famous for imitating sand eels.

Teasers do add some drag. If you need to cast really far, or into the wind, omit the teaser.

Link to more about: Teasers



Trolling Lures


To see some trolling lure examples follow this link: Trolling Lures



Leaders


When casting lures from the beach I will use an 18 inch leader of about 40 pound test made of monofilament or flourocarbon with a duolock snap on the bottom to attach the lure. The leader also provides something to grab onto when landing a fish on the beach. If I am using a teaser, I use a somewhat longer leader with a "dropper loop" for attaching the teaser.



Largemouth Basss Fishing Lures


Follow this link to see Largemouth Bass Fishing Lures.



Link back to the top